First Apple computer ready for auction

Apple 1

Created in 1976, the Apple-1 was only worth $666.66 and was one of an estimated 200 produced by the hand of co-founder Steve Wosniak. The original version, sold without a keyboard, monitor or power supply, came equipped with only 8 kilobytes of RAM, which is small potatoes compared to today’s memory standards.

A major drawback of the Apple-1 was the lack of a floppy drive. The programs were loaded onto the memory from tapes that were sold separately, making the total invoice for the Apple-1 a mere $741.66. One tape, labeled “BASIC,” that was used to load programming language, will be included in the sale at the .

Other items said to be included will be original packaging, manuals, cassette interface, basic tape, early documentation and provenance and a rare letter from Steve Jobs.

Though the Apple-1 was the first of its kind, it was soon replaced in 1977 by the more famous II. Just two months ago, another Apple-1 was sold on Ebay for $22,766.66 with only the cassette interface.

The auction will be at Christie’s auction house in London on November 23rd and feature the the Apple-1 alongside manuscripts and papers by Charles Babbage, Alan Turing and more. The Apple-1 is expected to sell for an estimated $242,400.


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