RWE, Siemens unveil plans for giant Welsh wind farm

The wind farm has been dubbed Gwynt y Mor, which means sea wind in Welsh
The German power company RWE and industrial group Siemens unveiled on Friday a joint venture to build a giant British offshore wind farm worth more than two billion euros (2.4 billion dollars).

The German power company RWE and industrial group Siemens unveiled on Friday a joint venture to build a giant British offshore wind farm worth more than two billion euros (2.4 billion dollars).

RWE's Innogy unit will own 60 precent of the project, while service provider SWM will take a stake of 30 percent and Siemens will hold the remaining 10 percent, an RWE statement said.

The wind farm has been dubbed Gwynt y Mor, which means sea wind in Welsh.

It is to be sited off the north coast of Wales, be completed in 2014, and supply 1,950 megawatts of per year, enough to power 400,000 homes.

Siemens is to furnish 160 and land connections and maintain the park for the first five years.


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Jun 04, 2010
It is to [...] supply 1,950 megawatts of electricity per year


Aaarrghhh. I can't even decide where to start complaining!

Jun 04, 2010
Agreed.

"Watt" is a measure of Power.

Power is a measure of the rate at which energy is consumed or supplied, i.e. "Joules per second".

Thus, "megawatts per year" is incorrect.

The farm could supply "megawatts" of power throughout the year, as in 1900000000 joules per second for an entire year, but it cannot supply "megawatts per year."

Such a measurement, i.e. "megawatts per year," would actually be a measure of the change in power, rather than a measure of the power itself.

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