NASA's TRMM satellite sees Hurricane Celia's moderate rainfall

June 22, 2010, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center
This 3-D image of Celia was created from Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission satellite data on June 20 at 0400 UTC (12 a.m. EDT) that showed powerful thunderstorms in the southwest quadrant of the storm pushed to heights of almost 9.32 miles (15 kilometers) shown in red, with moderate to heavy rainfall. Credit: NASA TRMM, Hal Pierce

The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission satellite known as TRMM has been monitoring the rainfall rates in Hurricane Celia, and noticed rain is falling moderately as the storm continues to strengthen.

At 5 a.m. EDT on June 22, Hurricane Celia had near 105 miles per hour. That makes Celia a category two storm on the Saffir-Simpson scale. National Hurricane Center forecasters noted that Celia could become a major hurricane (Category Three) in the next two days.

Celia's hurricane force winds extend outward up to 25 miles (35 km) from the center, and tropical storm force winds extend outward up to 90 miles (150 km).

Celia's center was located near 11.8 North latitude and 104.7 West longitude. That's about 500 miles south of Manzanillo, Mexico. Celia is moving toward the west near 8 mph (13 km/hr) and this general motion is expected to continue for the next 48 hours. Celia's estimated minimum central pressure is 970 millibars.

The TRMM satellite revealed moderate rainfall (green) around the center of Hurricane Celia on June 21 at 1753 UTC (1:53 p.m. EDT). Credit: NASA TRMM, Hal Pierce

The revealed moderate around the center of Hurricane Celia on June 21 at 1753 UTC (1:53 p.m. EDT). On June 20, as Celia was strengthening as a tropical storm, TRMM captured data that showed powerful thunderstorms in the southwest quadrant of the storm. The tops of those thunderstorms pushed to heights of almost 9.32 miles (15 kilometers). TRMM is managed by both NASA and the Japanese Space Agency, JAXA.

from the , GOES-11, did not see an eye this morning (June 22) although images from a polar orbiting satellite did see a small eye just after 0000 UTC (8 p.m. EDT) on June 21.

The east-southeasterly wind shear that is currently affecting Celia is forecast to relax. That will give Celia the ability to strengthen in the next 24 hours, thus, the possibility that Celia could reach Category Three strength.

Explore further: NASA's Aqua and Terra satellites view Tropical Storms Blas and Celia

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