Detailed Martian Scenes in New Images from Mars Orbiter

June 9, 2010, JPL/NASA
This image shows the west-facing side of an impact crater in the mid-latitudes of Mars' northern hemisphere. Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona

(PhysOrg.com) -- Six hundred recent observations of the Mars landscape from an orbiting telescopic camera include scenes of sinuous gullies, geometrical ridges and steep cliffs.

Each of the 600 newly released observations from the (HiRISE) camera aboard NASA's covers an area of several square miles on Mars and reveals details as small as desks.

The HiRISE images taken from April 5 to May 6, 2010, are now available on NASA's Planetary Data System and the camera team's website.

This image from the Gordii Dorsum region of Mars shows a large area covered with polygonal ridges in an almost geometric pattern. Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona

The camera is one of six instruments on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, which reached Mars in 2006.

Explore further: New Martian Views From Orbiting Camera Show Diversity

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technicalengeneering
3 / 5 (2) Jun 09, 2010
This looks very similar to these images of drought on earth:
http://en.wikiped...equences
http://nl.wikiped...erre.jpg
I wonder how they got there...

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