NASA's Terra sees ash plume pulled to the northeast by a low

NASA's Terra sees ash plume pulled to the northeast by a low
NASA's Terra satellite captured the ash plume from Eyjafjallajokull Volcano, Iceland, on May 18 at 12:20 UTC (8:20 a.m. EDT), blowing to the northeast due to a low pressure area. Credit: NASA Goddard / MODIS Rapid Response Team

NASA's Terra satellite continues to provide visible and infrared imagery of Iceland's Eyjafjallajokull Volcano ash plume, and the most recent imagery showed the plume being pulled in a northeasterly direction over the island nation.

The brownish was being pushed to the northeast from a low pressure area situated to Iceland's northeast. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument that flies aboard Terra captured an image on May 18 at 12:20 UTC (8:20 a.m. EDT).

works with other agencies on using satellite observations to aid in the detection and monitoring of aviation hazards caused by .

As weather systems to continue to interact with the ash plume, it will continue to shift, so air travel may always be affected.


Explore further

Image: NASA's Terra satellite keeps eye on Eyjafjallajokull's ash plume

More information: For more on this NASA program, visit: http://science.larc.nasa.gov/asap/research-ash.html.
Citation: NASA's Terra sees ash plume pulled to the northeast by a low (2010, May 18) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2010-05-nasa-terra-ash-plume-northeast.html
This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.
0 shares

Feedback to editors

User comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more