Image: NASA's Terra satellite keeps eye on Eyjafjallajokull's ash plume

April 20, 2010, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center
The MODIS instrument on NASA's Terra satellite captured a visible image of the ash plume (brown) drifting south and east from Eyjafjallajökull volcano in Iceland at 11:55 UTC (7:55 a.m. EDT). Credit: NASA's MODIS Rapid Response Team

NASA's Terra satellite captured an image of the ash plume from Iceland's Eyjafjallajokull volcano this morning, April 20, as it flew overhead from its vantage point in space.

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument on NASA's captured visible image of the ash plume (consisting of fine particles of pulverized rock) at 11:55 UTC (7:55 a.m. EDT). The plume appeared to be lighter in color than the previous few days, and it was drifting south and east over the Northern Atlantic Ocean.

Explore further: NASA'S Terra Satellite Captures Ash Plume of Icelandic Volcano

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