Imani on the weakening on weekend

This isn't a good weekend for keeping tropical cyclones alive, as Tropical Storm Omais is becoming extra-tropical in the northwestern Pacific Ocean and Tropical Storm Imani appears doomed over the weekend in the Southern Indian Ocean.

Imani was still hanging onto tropical storm status on March 26 at 0900 UTC (5 a.m. EDT) with near 52 mph (45 knots), but the storm is running into vertical wind shear - basically a tropical cyclone killer. Imani was located about 810 nautical miles southwest of the Cocos Islands, near 21.3 South and 86.4 East. It was slugging southward at 3 mph (2 knots).

On March 26, NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Imani at 0836 UTC and the instrument onboard captured a visible image of the storm. It showed that the northern half of the tropical cyclone contained very scattered thunderstorms which is conducive to strong wind shear in that quadrant of the storm.

revealed that its low-level circulation center is now "fully exposed" on the north side of the storm, and that there is weak and sheared-off convection (winds coming in block thunderstorms from forming by pushing rising air away). That wind shear is forecast to increase, so Imani's chances of weakening are also increased. Imani is expected to become a depression over the weekend.


Explore further

Imani reaches cyclone status 'by the tail'

Citation: Imani on the weakening on weekend (2010, March 26) retrieved 16 October 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2010-03-imani-weakening-weekend.html
This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.
0 shares

Feedback to editors

User comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more