Nintendo wins Australia payout over game-copying device

Young boys play Japanese video game giant Nintendo's portable video game console "Nintendo DS"
Young boys play Japanese video game giant Nintendo's portable video game console "Nintendo DS" at a showroom in Tokyo in 2006. Gaming giant Nintendo said Friday it had won 556,500 US dollars' compensation from an Australian firm for selling illegal game-copying devices.

Gaming giant Nintendo said Friday it had won 556,500 US dollars' compensation from an Australian firm for selling illegal game-copying devices.

Nintendo said it won a Federal Court case against online console and accessory seller GadgetGear over the gadgets, known as R4 cards, which pirate games for its handheld DS system.

"GadgetGear and its directors have now acknowledged that game copying devices infringe both Nintendo's copyright and Nintendo's trademarks and that they are illegal circumvention devices," the Japanese company said.

"As a result, GadgetGear and the directors have agreed to permanently refrain from importing, offering for sale and/or selling game copier devices."

GadgetGear and directors Patrick and James Li were ordered to pay 620,000 Australian dollars (556,500 US dollars) in damages and hand over all its stock of copiers for destruction.

Nintendo said it was mulling further action against other Australian sellers of pirating gadgets, and would use "all means available to it under the law".

This month, an Australian man agreed to pay Nintendo 1.3 million US dollars in an out-of-court settlement after illegally uploading New . to the Internet six days before its global release.


Explore further

Gamer to pay Nintendo $1.3 mln for illegal upload

(c) 2010 AFP

Citation: Nintendo wins Australia payout over game-copying device (2010, February 19) retrieved 22 October 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2010-02-nintendo-australia-payout-game-copying-device.html
This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.
0 shares

Feedback to editors

User comments

Feb 20, 2010
"GadgetGear over the gadgets, known as R4 cards, which pirate games for its handheld DS system."

There is something inherently wrong about that statement which would be paramount to saying DVD players pirate the content that can be viewed using them, does that mean class action lawsuits will be filed against proprietors of foreign region DVD equipment next?

Feb 20, 2010
Also does this mean that DVTuner card makers will be sued for allowing the recording of HD broadcasts, and chipmakers sued for allowing their microelectronics to capacitate electronic signals which might allow for piracy, this will eat silicon valley out of business and spit the market into a new depression of a trashbin.

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more