Rover Confirms Meteorite on Mars

Rover Confirms Meteorite on Mars
Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell University

(PhysOrg.com) -- Composition measurements by NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity confirm that this rock on the Martian surface is an iron-nickel meteorite.

Rover Confirms Meteorite on Mars
Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell University

This image combines exposures from the left eye and right eye of the rover's panoramic camera to provide a three-dimensional view when seen through red-green glasses with the red lens on the left.

The camera took the component images during the 1,961st Martian day, or , of Opportunity's mission on Mars (July 31), after approaching close enough to touch the rock with tools on the rover's robotic arm.

Researchers have informally named the rock "Block Island." With a width of about two-thirds of a meter (2 feet), it is the largest yet found on . Opportunity found a smaller iron-nickel meteorite, called "Heat Shield Rock" in late 2004.

Provided by JPL/NASA (news : web)


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Citation: Rover Confirms Meteorite on Mars (2009, August 6) retrieved 1 December 2021 from https://phys.org/news/2009-08-rover-meteorite-mars.html
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