Spitzer Space Telescope: Warmed Up and Ready to Go

M17
An infrared view of the choppy star-making cloud called M17, or the Swan nebula. Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Univ. of Wisc.

NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope has put its infrared eyes back on the sky to observe the cold and dusty universe.

The telescope ran out of on May 15, 2009, after more than five-and-a-half years of observations.

Two of its infrared channels are working at full capacity at the observatory's new "warm" temperature of approximately 30 Kelvin (minus 406 degrees Fahrenheit) -- still quite chilly by our Earthly standards.

Engineers and scientists have been busy recalibrating the telescope and making preparations for Spitzer's new era of science. Routine science operations begin today, July 27, 2009.

More information about the warm mission can be found at www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/spi … ws/spitzer-warm.html .

Provided by JPL/NASA (news : web)


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Spitzer Telescope Warms Up to New Career

Citation: Spitzer Space Telescope: Warmed Up and Ready to Go (2009, July 28) retrieved 28 February 2020 from https://phys.org/news/2009-07-spitzer-space-telescope-ready.html
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