Qwest doubles top broadband speed in some cities

July 20, 2009

(AP) -- Qwest is doubling its top Internet download speeds in some areas to keep up with the offerings of cable companies.

The phone company is introducing a plan with of 40 megabits per second and upload speeds of 20 mbps in a few areas, including Denver, Tucson, Ariz., Salt Lake City, and Minneapolis/St. Paul. It costs $110 per month for the first year when combined with home phone service.

International Inc. aims to add more areas in the next few months. It's also offering higher upload speeds to existing customers: 5 mbps for $5 per month.

Cable companies are rolling out a new cable-modem technology this year, allowing them to offer download speeds of 50 mbps.

©2009 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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