Toshiba to launch 32nm process NAND flash memory

Toshiba Corporation today announced that it will start shipping NAND flash memory products fabricated with 32nm process technology. Samples of the world's first 32nm generation, 32-gigabit (Gb) single chips (4 gigabytes (GB)), offering the largest density of any NAND flash chip, are available from today, and 16Gb chip (2GB) products, the current mainstream density, will be available in July in Japan. The 32Gb chips will first be applied to memory cards and USB memories and subsequently extended to embedded products.

Toshiba is leading the industry in applying 43nm process technology to 32GB products, which stack eight 32Gb . Application of the advanced 32nm process technology will further shrink chip size, allowing Toshiba to boost productivity and bring further enhancements to high density, small sized products.

As more mobile phones and mobile equipment provide support for video and movies, demand for larger density, small sized memory products is growing stronger.

Toshiba will start mass production of 32Gb NAND flash memories in July 2009, two months ahead of its original plan. 16Gb products will start to ship from the third quarter of 2009 (October to December 2009). The new chips will be produced at Toshiba's Yokkaichi Operations, in Mie prefecture, Japan.

By accelerating process migration and integrating multi level cell technologies, and through continued advances in productivity, Toshiba intends to enhance its competitiveness in the memory business.

Source:


Explore further

Toshiba to launch 43nm SLC NAND flash memory

Citation: Toshiba to launch 32nm process NAND flash memory (2009, April 27) retrieved 20 September 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2009-04-toshiba-32nm-nand-memory.html
This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.
0 shares

Feedback to editors

User comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more