SKorea clears chipmakers of cartel charges

April 20, 2009
Electronics workers on a micrchip assembly line near Seoul. South Korea's anti-trust watchdog has saidit has found no evidence that leading chipmakers in South Korea and other countries colluded to fix prices.

South Korea's anti-trust watchdog said Monday it has found no evidence that leading chipmakers in South Korea and other countries colluded to fix prices.

The Fair Trade Commission said it closed a probe into allegations of a cartel operated by 10 makers of static (SRAM) chips in , Japan and the United States.

SRAM chips are used to store data in servers, switches and low-power devices such as mobile phones.

The two South Korean firms were Samsung Electronics, the world's largest microchip maker, and Hynix .

The probe was launched in October 2006 to find out whether SRAM makers were involved in an international price-fixing scheme.

"We have found no evidence of a conspiracy," Fair Trade Commission regulator Shin Bong-Sam told reporters.

(c) 2009 AFP

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