Pricing can cut CO2 emissions from electric generators

April 28, 2008

Levying a price on carbon dioxide released by electric generators could considerably reduce greenhouse gas emissions — even before the deployment of any environmentally friendly technology — according to scientists in Pennsylvania. Their report is scheduled for the May 1 issue of ACS’ Environmental Science & Technology.

In the study, Jay Apt and colleagues explain that placing a price on greenhouse gas emissions has gained favor as a way to encourage utility investment in alternative technology, such as capturing carbon dioxide from smokestacks before its release into the atmosphere.

They estimate a price of $35 per metric ton on generators’ CO2 emissions would decrease consumer demand for electricity. As a result, utilities would burn less fuel, release less carbon dioxide and cause emissions to fall by as much as 10 percent.

The study concluded that two of the nation’s largest electric generation and transmission systems are likely to see large CO2 reductions even with a modest price on emissions. “A price on carbon dioxide emissions that has been shown in earlier work to stimulate investment in new generation technology also provides significant CO2 reductions before new technology is deployed at large scale,” the report says.

Source: ACS

Explore further: Subsidizing electric vehicles inefficient way to reduce CO2 emissions: study

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mikiwud
2 / 5 (4) Apr 28, 2008
I see no names,only "scientists"!We can not personally call them pratts.This is the crap already in place in Europe in part causing rises in power prices hitting the less well off and causing "power poverty".ALL taxes are passed on to the customer.It costs the rich more,the poor can't afford it.Increases in power costs hits industry thus loosing jobs and driving then to countries without these silly taxes.
Rick69
2 / 5 (4) Apr 29, 2008
What a joke! It doesn't take scientists to discover the basic law of supply and demand and price elasticity. Any beginning economics student could have told us the same thing. In fact, just about any high school student could tell you that if you make the price of something higher, people will use less of it. Physorg is really reaching for something to post on this site.

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