NASA gets ready for another space mission

March 31, 2008

Now that the latest space shuttle Endeavour mission is completed, the U.S. space agency said it's preparing for the May launch of space shuttle Discovery.

National Aeronautics and Space Administration officials said Discovery's two solid rocket boosters and 15-story external tank are undergoing final work and checkouts in the Kennedy Space Center's massive Vehicle Assembly Building. The shuttle itself is being readied to be moved to the assembly building.

The STS-124 mission is to be the 26th shuttle flight to the International Space Station and the second of three flights that will carry elements of the Japanese laboratory Kibo to the ISS.

Discovery is scheduled to lift off at 7:26 p.m. EDT May 25 from launch pad 39A at the space center.

Copyright 2008 by United Press International

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