Digital sound used for wolf roll call

March 20, 2008

Wildlife researchers plan to use a digital speaker-recorder system to count and keep track of wolves in Idaho.

The Howlbox system will howl and researchers hopes wolves will howl back, The New York Times reported Wednesday.

David Ausband, a research associate at the University of Montana Cooperative Wildlife Research Unit, said spectrogram technology will allow scientists to identify how many individual wolves have responded. The newspaper said four Howlboxes will be placed in remote areas in June, when packs gather with their spring-born pups.

Copyright 2008 by United Press International

Explore further: Wolves howl because they care

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