Space station achieves permanent Harmony

November 14, 2007
Space station achieves permanent Harmony
Canadarm2, under the control of Flight Engineer Dan Tani, moves the Harmony module into position. Image credit: NASA TV

The new Harmony node is now in position to receive the European and Japanese modules to be added to the International Space Station.

Station crew members moved Harmony from its temporary location on the left side of the Unity node to its new home on the front of the U.S. laboratory Destiny Wednesday morning. Disengagement of the first set of bolts holding Harmony to Unity began at 3:58 a.m. EST.

Flight Engineer Dan Tani operated the station's robotic arm. Commander Peggy Whitson operated the common berthing mechanisms, first to free Harmony after Tani had grappled it with the arm, and later to drive bolts firmly securing it to the front of Destiny.

Driving of the final bolts to attach Harmony to its new home was completed at 5:45 a.m.

After its Wednesday move, Harmony is in position to welcome visiting space shuttles. It also will offer docking ports to the European Space Agency's Columbus laboratory, scheduled to arrive next month, and Japan's Kibo experiment module, to become a part of the International Space Station next year.

Source: NASA

Explore further: Space station module relocation makes way for commercial crew spacecraft

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