International Space Station Crew Sends Thanksgiving Message

November 22, 2007
The International Space Station

Orbiting more than 200 miles above the Earth, the crew of the International Space Station has sent home a special Thanksgiving message that is now airing on NASA Television and the agency's Web site.


"We wanted to say happy Thanksgiving to all our NASA viewers," Expedition 16 Commander Peggy Whitson, an Iowa native, said. "We feel particularly privileged and thankful to be up here on board the International Space Station this Thanksgiving, and we're looking forward to our activities this week. We have a busy week with spacewalks, and we hope that you also are having a great Thanksgiving."

"My family, we gather for Thanksgiving, and we spend a minute just thinking about the things we're thankful for and, of course, I'm thankful for the continued health of my family and my loved ones," Flight Engineer DanTani, an Illinois native, said. "Also this year, I'm thankful that I'm safely on the space station, conducting our mission successfully and having a great time doing it."

The astronauts showed some of the food they will eat during their holiday dinner, including shrimp cocktail, an astronaut favorite. Smoked turkey, cornbread dressing and "lots of hot sauce" also are on the menu.

Source: NASA

Explore further: Thanksgiving in space: Turkey, green beans and even football

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