New NEC Technology Isolates Viruses At the Core

October 9, 2007 by Mary Anne Simpson weblog
NEC Multi-Core CPU
NEC Multi-Core CPU

NEC has developed a new technology for spotting, isolating and stopping viruses at the core level of its multi-core CPU. Thus, the system keeps running, while the infected core is disabled while a fix is developed and then downloaded from the Internet.

NEC has developed a new technique for running software in separate processes on each core of a multi-core CPU whereby it stops viruses before they spread throughout the Internet-connected device, according to Digital World Tokyo.

NEC has not named the new technology that is designed to spot the virus in any of the software processes and immediately isolate and shut down that core. The technology allows the device to continue operating while the infected core is shut down, thus preventing the infection from spreading into the system.

Utilizing this method of isolation and disabling the mal-functioning core then allows anti-virus software to tackle the problem. In addition, the technique allows the user to hold the virus in place while anti-virus updates are created and then downloaded from the Internet. The technology can be applied to cell phones, cars, and potentially computers.

NEC may be encouraging manufacturers to buy their multi-core chip due to its design with the capability to segregate, isolate and treat sophisticated viruses. As noted by most security companies and software engineers the current and future range of potential harm created by rampant and uncontrollable viruses is a world wide concern.

A technology that allows commercial, governmental and private users to stop the virus dead in its tracks without creating a pandemic spread of sophisticated viruses throughout systems is a innovation worth noting.

Explore further: New software can verify someone's identity by their DNA in minutes

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