Remarkable journeys may save bat species

July 12, 2007

Researchers have new hope for the future of an endangered species of bat after two of the flying mammals traveled 110 miles to a Welsh cave to live.

While two members of the Greater Horseshoe bat species initially resided in the British county of Gloucestershire, both animals traveled 110 miles, years apart, to recently find themselves together in a cave in northern Wales, The Telegraph said Wednesday.

Bat researcher David Priddis said while the chance the bats somehow initiated the remarkable reunion appears slim, one cannot overlook the animals' amazing abilities.

"It is not too far-fetched to say they found each other because bats have very complicated, sophisticated sonar systems way above our hearing and the Greater Horseshoe's is higher than most," Priddis said.

Priddis added that while the winged animals have since begun cohabitating in the cave in Wales' Conwy Valley, the female bat's young age will delay any potential mating with her male counterpart.

Nonetheless, experts are encouraged by a potential mating pair of the bats, whose species has grown endangered throughout most of Britain.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: Team reveals the whole genome sequences of rare red bat

Related Stories

Team reveals the whole genome sequences of rare red bat

July 17, 2017

A recent study, affiliated with the Korean Genomics Industrialization and Commercialization Center (KOGIC) at South Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) has presented the first whole genome sequence ...

Cameras light up bats in the dark

June 30, 2017

An Associate Professor in veterinary public health at Massey University has been involved in developing tools to watch bats as they hibernate that may be key to saving them from a disease decimating their populations.

The big ecological roles of small natural features

July 5, 2017

Ecologists and conservationists have long recognized that keystone species have major ecological importance disproportionate to their abundance or size. Think beavers, sea stars and prairie dogs—species that keep a ecosystem ...

Recommended for you

Hot spot at Hawaii? Not so fast

August 18, 2017

Through analysis of volcanic tracks, Rice University geophysicists have concluded that hot spots like those that formed the Hawaiian Islands aren't moving as fast as recently thought.

Evidence found of white dwarf remnant after supernova

August 18, 2017

An international team of space scientists has found evidence of what they believe is a remnant of a type Iax supernova—a white dwarf moving in a way that suggests it was blown across part of the universe by the power of ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.