Panasonic Introduces Wide-Angle Compact Camera

May 22, 2007
Panasonic Introduces Wide-Angle Compact Camera

The appeal of Panasonic's new 12.2-megapixel Lumix DMC-FX100 is not its high megapixel count, but its 28mm wide angle—the first 12MP compact camera to include this capability, according to the company. In addition, the FX100 debuts a few fresh scene modes and an upgraded picture playback feature.

The FX100 features a 3.6X optical zoom, and like all other models in the 2007 Lumix line, includes Intelligent Image Stabilization. The camera will have a standard 2.5-inch LCD and is compatible with SD and SDHC memory cards. For video, the FX100 can record 1280 by 720 clips at 15 frames per second.

The camera's high picture quality and quick response time is due to the DMC-FX100's "newly developed exclusive LEICA DC lens and the high-quality, high-performance Venus Engine III, [so] you no longer have to sacrifice power in a compact camera," said Alex Fried, a national marketing manager for Panasonic.

Panasonic added two scene modes: high-speed burst shooting—eight shots per second, continuously—and the ability to shoot at an ISO level of 6400. However, both of these features are available only when shooting 2- or 2.5-megapixel images.

The picture playback also gets an upgrade, where images are automatically sorted into categories such as portraits and nightscapes, for playing slideshows of each category.

The Lumix DMC-FX100 will be available in July 2007. Pricing is not yet set.

Copyright 2007 by Ziff Davis Media, Distributed by United Press International

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