NTT DoCoMo Unveils Secure 3G FOMA F903iBSC Handset for Business Use

March 14, 2007
NTT DoCoMo Unveils Secure 3G FOMA F903iBSC Handset for Business Use
NTT DoCoMo F903iBSC

NTT DoCoMo announced today that this month they will begin marketing the 3G FOMA F903iBSC business-use handset to enable companies to address security issues such as information leaks and non-work-related use of corporate phones.

To avoid information leakage, the handset's camera, external memory, USB and infrared ports, and the Osaifu-Keitai e-wallet service are not available. In addition, the phonebook is limited to 101 entries.

Functions such as phonebook, e-mail, scheduler, data box, call records and screen memos can be reset remotely by DoCoMo at the request of the customer if a handset is lost. This service requires an optional subscription, and will be made available from April.

Security is further enhanced by a tool that automatically locks all functions when the handset is shut. Unlocking can be handled with biometric fingerprint authorization or a password.

To focus the handset on business use, the F903iBSC does not contain a music player or preinstalled i-appli Java-based applications.

DoCoMo will market the handset in Japan from March 19.

Source: NTT DoCoMo

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