Study: Young teens thrive in college

January 16, 2007

A new study shows U.S. students who enter college at 12 to 14 years of age no longer fit the stereotype of unhappy, humorless and isolated "nerds."

In fact, the University of Washington research paints a much different and much more positive and multifaceted portrait of such gifted students.

"In reality they are extremely versatile, interested, interesting and sociable," said Kathleen Noble, lead author of the study and director of the UW's Halbert and Nancy Robinson Center for Young Scholars.

The study showed the vast majority of students entering UW at an early age did so for the intellectual challenge and most said their lives have lived up to their own and their parents' expectations in a number of work, intellectual and personal categories.

"People often ask us what happens to our (early enrollment) students after they graduate," said Noble. "This study shows for the most part they are happy and their lives are enriched socially, intellectually and emotionally."

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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