Plans in the works for huge manmade reef

January 1, 2007

Thinning kelp beds off Southern California are expected to flourish again after completion of one of the country's biggest artificial kelp reefs.

The San Diego Union-Tribune reported that the $20 million, 150-acre reef is expected to reinvigorate marine life damaged by the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station. The manmade reef will be bounded by the San Clemente Pier to the north and San Mateo Point to the south.

Scientists hope the reef will spawn the dense kelp forest that once inhabited the area and provided home to an abundance of sea life, the newspaper said.

The Union-Tribune reported that if the project receives approval from the California Coastal Commission, Southern California Edison could begin construction of the reef as early as next summer.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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