Great Lakes levels steadily dropping

Water levels in Lake Michigan and Lake Huron, although constantly in flux, are showing a steady decrease, experts say.

Lake levels can rise or drop as much as 6 feet in only a matter of years. However, concern is increasing that the overall level of the lakes is on a decline, the Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel reported.

Much of the decline is blamed on the Army Corps of Engineer's 1960s dredging of a shipping channel in the St. Clair River. Ongoing erosion in the St. Clair River may be the cause of a deeper lakebed and expanding drain holes.

The St. Clair River is the main outflow for Lake Michigan and Lake Huron.

The Georgian Bay Association, a Canadian property owners' group -- contends that the lake levels are dropping at a rate of about one inch per year. However, since levels are constantly in flux, it is hard to determine exactly what "normal" levels should be.

The U.S. and Canadian governments are planning to launch a $14.7 million study of water levels on the upper Great Lakes.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International


Explore further

Great Lakes flooding: The warning signs that homes must be moved

Citation: Great Lakes levels steadily dropping (2006, September 18) retrieved 5 December 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2006-09-great-lakes-steadily.html
This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.
0 shares

Feedback to editors

User comments