Norway fails to fulfill whaling quota

August 21, 2006

Norway says its fishermen will not be able to fulfill this year's whaling quota, with about 500 minke whales caught out of the quota's 1,052.

Conservationists say a declining appetite for whale meat is the reason for the decline but the government blames higher fuel prices and bad weather conditions, The Guardian reported Monday.

Norway is the only nation in the world to allow commercial whaling.

The Scandinavian nation resumed commercial whaling in 1993, despite a 1986 international moratorium designed to protect the species from extinction, the newspaper said. Japan and Iceland hunt whales but say they only do so for scientific research.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Expedition to 'health-check' southern right whales around South Georgia

Related Stories

Graphic Australian video of Japanese whaling released

November 28, 2017

Activist group Sea Shepherd on Tuesday released graphic video of Japanese fishermen harpooning whales in the Southern Ocean after a long battle with the Australian government to make the images public.

Japanese whalers head to Antarctic

November 9, 2017

Japanese whaling vessels left port Thursday for an annual hunting voyage in the Antarctic, this time to kill 333 minke whales, despite international calls to stop the practice.

Study sheds new light on krill larvae survival

November 15, 2017

An international study involving British Antarctic Survey (BAS) scientists has shed light on how the larvae of Antarctic krill – small shrimp-like crustaceans – use sea ice to ensure their successful development and survival ...

Whaling: The hunters and the hunted

October 28, 2016

Thirty years into a moratorium on commercial whaling, hundreds of the marine mammals, some endangered, are killed every year—some in open defiance of the ban, others in the name of scientific research.

Recommended for you

Mystery solved for mega-avalanches in Tibet

January 23, 2018

An international scientific effort determined the cause of a highly unusual and deadly glacier avalanche in Tibet in 2016, a new Nature Geoscience paper says.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.