Golden eagle found poisoned in Scotland

June 18, 2006

Police and conservationists in Scotland are investigating the poisoning of a golden eagle, one of Britain's rarest birds, The Guardian reported.

The bird, discovered between Banchory and Braemar in Aberdeenshire, was found to have the banned pesticide carbofuran in its system, the newspaper said. Tests by the Scottish Agricultural Science Agency in Edinburgh confirmed the presence of poison. Grampian police said they are treating the latest find "very seriously."

Only 430 breeding pairs of golden eagles are know to be in Scotland, 18 of which are believed to be in the Grampian area, the newspaper said.

According to police, at least 14 golden eagles have been poisoned in the past 10 years.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Crowds within crowd found to outperform 'wisdom of the crowd'

January 18, 2018

A team of researchers affiliated with institutions in Argentina, the U.S. and Germany has found that there is a way to improve on the "wisdom of the crowd"—separate the people in a given crowd into smaller groups and let ...

How did we evolve to live longer?

January 18, 2018

Research shows a collection of small adaptations in stress activated proteins, accumulated over millennia of human history, could help to explain our increased natural defences and longer lifespan.

Glacial moulin formation triggered by rapid lake drainage

January 18, 2018

Scientists are uncovering the mystery of how, where and when important glacial features called moulins form on the Greenland Ice Sheet. Moulins, vertical conduits that penetrate through the half-mile-deep ice, efficiently ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.