In Brief: IT consulting seen rising steadily to 2010

April 18, 2006

Demand for technology consultants should rise steadily worldwide over the next five years, a research group said Tuesday.

Framingham, Mass.-based IDC reported that global information-technology consulting is expected to rise at a compound annual growth rate of 5.2 percent between now and 2010.

"After a somewhat prolonged period of stagnation, the IT consulting services market has clearly seen a return to many positive trends," said Bo Di Muccio, program manager for consulting services research. "IDC has seen an increase in average utilization rates, moderate stabilization in project/contract size, sharply rejuvenated hiring activity, and an increase in corporate focus on core services -- a key driver of external IT services spending," he added.

As for regional breakdown, while North America currently sees the largest spending rate on IT consulting, IDC anticipates the biggest growth rate in the industry will be seen in Latin America, Central Europe, the Middle East and Africa over the next five years.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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