Briefs: IT employment continued to grow in January

February 7, 2006

Information-technology employment continued to grow in January -- albeit by a small percentage -- an IT trade association announced Tuesday.

Employment of IT workers posted its fourth consecutive month of growth in January, according to the National Association of Computer Consultant Businesses. In January 2006 there were 3,562,900 IT workers, an increase of close to 0.2 percent from the previous month and nearly 1.8 percent from January 2005, the group said.

The NACCB represents IT staffing and solutions firms.

The health of IT is closely correlated with the strength of the general economy. As businesses expand and look to increase productivity through technology, the IT sector including IT employment prosper, the NACCB noted in a release. In periods of expansion, many firms turn to IT staffing companies to assist them in meeting their IT employment needs.

"I am pleased to see that IT employment continues to show month-over-month and year-over-year growth," said Mark Roberts, NACCB CEO.

The IT Employment graph is available at www.naccb.org/employment-index … y2006_it_release.pdf

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Report: Supply of IT Pros Down, Though Demand Is Up

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