Scott's s South Pole epic trek recreated

January 17, 2006

Ninety-four years ago Tuesday British Capt. Robert Scott discovered his Antarctic expedition had been beaten to the South Pole.

Five other Britons this week completed a recreation of part of Scott's journey across Antarctica with replicas of the equipment he used, The Independent reported Tuesday. The team completed their 170-mile trek using heavy wooden sleds carrying reindeer-skin sleeping bags, canvas tents and birch and hickory-wood skis.

Covering only about a 10th of the 1,600-mile round trip Scott and his party attempted, the team said their 17-day journey required extremely hard work in temperatures of minus-31 degrees Fahrenheit.

The rigors of the Antarctic eventually claimed the lives of Scott and his comrades after they were beaten to the pole by Norwegian Roald Amundsen in 1912.

But the efforts of the modern team have not been totally without reward, The Independent said, noting the British team has raised more than $1 million for charity.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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