Google offers free Web analytics

November 14, 2005

A woman works on her computer as the logo of web search engine Google is seen on the wall
Google said Monday its Web analytics service will be available for free as of Nov. 14. Formerly known as Urchin from Google, Google Analytics will be available to help users make use of data to improve their marketing abilities.

"We want to give all online marketers and publishers access to powerful web analytics to help them better understand what their customers want. With this knowledge, businesses can create more accurate advertising and build better websites," Paul Muret, the Internet search engine's engineering director, said in a news release.

"By making this powerful service free, we aim to give all websites -- large and small -- the tools they need to better serve their customers, make more money, and improve the web experience for everyone."

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

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