Study: Tall women are more ambitious

October 5, 2005

Two Scottish researchers say they've determined tall women are more ambitious in their careers and less inclined to start a family than shorter women.

Psychologists Denis Deady of Stirling University and Miriam Law Smith of St Andrews University questioned 1,220 women from Britain, the United States, Canada and Australia, The Scotsman reported Wednesday.

The psychologists said they found taller women were less broody, had fewer children and were more ambitious. They were also more likely to have their first child at a later age.

Deady and Smith told The Scotsman they decided to conduct the research after studies suggested taller women had fewer children because they struggled to find a mate. Deady and Smith say their research disproves that theory.

"We think that tall women may have higher levels of testosterone, which may cause them to have more 'masculine' personalities," said Deady, who also stressed that did not mean taller women were unattractive.

The research appears in the journal Personality and Individual Differences.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

Explore further: Shorter woman, taller man: Preferences for partner height translate into actual partner choices

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Physicists show ion pairs perform enhanced 'spooky action'

March 28, 2017

Adding to strong recent demonstrations that particles of light perform what Einstein called "spooky action at a distance," in which two separated objects can have a connection that exceeds everyday experience, physicists ...

Female menstrual cycle in a dish

March 28, 2017

Northwestern Medicine has developed a miniature female reproductive tract that fits in the palm of your hand and could eventually change the future of research and treatment of diseases in women's reproductive organs.

Physics can predict wealth inequality

March 28, 2017

The 2016 election year highlighted the growing problem of wealth inequality and finding ways to help the people who are falling behind. This human urge of compassion isn't new, but the big question that remains to be addressed ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.