Study says spyware still stealing data

September 14, 2005

Spyware is a growing threat to personal data as a new study finds 15 percent of the known threats are capable of copying keystrokes and pinching passwords.

Chicago's Aladdin Knowledge Systems released a report Wednesday that concludes that spyware is becoming increasingly dedicated to identity theft and industrial espionage.

According to an analysis of around 2,000 known spywares, most spyware is aimed at eavesdropping on Web-surfing habits, but a whopping 15 percent are considered serious threats to individual and personal security.

Aladdin, which just happens to market Internet security solutions, recommends IT crews ferret out spyware in their networks and install up-to-date firewalls and other security programs.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

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