Screening for security: millimeter-wave scanner identifies non-metallic weapons

August 30, 2005

If you're looking for concealed weapons these days, you need more than x-ray machines and metal detectors. You want something that also will identify non-metallic weapons, or any other threatening object that may be concealed under clothing.

Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have developed an innovative screening technology that uses harmless, ultrahigh-frequency radio waves to penetrate clothing and can quickly identify plastic explosives and other types of weapons.

The active millimeter-wave technology rapidly scans people and sends reflected signals into a high-speed image processing computer which produces a high-resolution 3-D image.

The scanning technology is rapid, produce an image in less than three seconds. It can be used in a variety of public areas, such as airports, court houses, federal buildings, prisons, embassies, schools, sporting events, mass transit systems and nuclear sites to minimize delays and the indignity of physical searches that are often necessary to resolve ambiguous alarms.

Explore further: When data's deep, dark places need to be illuminated

Related Stories

When data's deep, dark places need to be illuminated

February 6, 2017

Much of the data of the World Wide Web hides like an iceberg below the surface. The so-called 'deep web' has been estimated to be 500 times bigger than the 'surface web' seen through search engines like Google. For scientists ...

Building a Google for the dark web

January 9, 2017

In today's data-rich world, companies, governments and individuals want to analyze anything and everything they can get their hands on – and the World Wide Web has loads of information. At present, the most easily indexed ...

Recommended for you

ZTE launches world's first 5G-ready smartphone

February 26, 2017

Chinese telecoms giant ZTE unveiled Sunday what it said is the world's first smartphone compatible with the lightening-fast 5G mobile internet service that networks expect to have up and running by 2020.

Stargazers applaud as moon eclipses sun

February 26, 2017

Stargazers applauded as they were plunged into darkness Sunday when the moon passed in front of the sun in a spectacular "ring of fire" eclipse.

Canada conservationist warns of 'cyber poaching'

February 25, 2017

Photographers, poachers and eco-tour operators are in the crosshairs of a Canadian conservationist who warns that tracking tags are being hacked and misused to harass and hunt endangered animals.

Polymer additive could revolutionize plastics recycling

February 24, 2017

When Geoffrey Coates, the Tisch University Professor of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, gives a talk about plastics and recycling, he usually opens with this question: What percentage of the 78 million tons of plastic used ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.