The Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society publishes papers on systematic and evolutionary zoology and comparative, functional and other studies where relevant to these areas. Studies of extinct as well as living animals are included. Reviews are also published; these may be invited by the Editorial Board, but uninvited reviews may also be considered. The Zoological Journal also has a wide circulation amongst zoologists and although narrowly specialized papers are not excluded, potential authors should bear that readership in mind.

Publisher
Wiley
Website
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1096-3642
Impact factor
2.658 (2013)

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DNA reveals history of Aotearoa's manu

Previously shrouded in mystery, the evolutionary history of kōkako, huia, and tīeke saddlebacks have been revealed by a University of Otago study.

Why don't insects freeze solid in the Arctic?

Life in the Arctic is harsh. Arctic temperatures are punishing, making life difficult for many animals to survive. Yet lots of insects, including mosquitoes, manage to thrive in the frozen region. So why don't they freeze ...

Europe's most recent fossil of giant tortoise discovered

An international team of scientists, including Uwe Fritz and Christian Kehlmaier from Senckenberg, has made an astonishing discovery in the Zubbio di Cozzo San Pietro cave in Sicily, a burial site from the Copper/Bronze Age: ...

Early dinosaur breathed like a bird

Pelecanimimus polyodon from the Lower Cretaceous (125 Ma) is the first predatory dinosaur found in Spain. An international team of paleontologists have now discovered features on the fossil that are typical of birds and dinosaurs ...

Discovery of new marine worm species

Researchers from the Swedish Museum of Natural History have identified a new species of marine worm living in the Basque region of Spain. Named Faerlea assembli, the worm is just 0.8mm long and was discovered as part of research ...

Barks in the night lead to the discovery of new species

The raucous calls of tree hyraxes—small, herbivorous mammals—reverberate through the night in the forests of West and Central Africa, but their sound differs depending on the location.

Dental crowding: Ancient baleen whales had a mouth full

A strange phenomenon happens with modern blue whales, humpback whales and gray whales: they have teeth in the womb but are born toothless. Replacing the teeth is baleen, a series of plates composed of thin, hair- and fingernail-like ...

Cryptic fleshy coat aids larvae in crawling on a moss carpet

The roles of physical structures in animal camouflage are not well known. This study illuminates an overlooked role of a mechanism for camouflage. Dr. Imada investigated how larvae of the long-bodied crane flies achieve uncanny ...

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