The Soil Science Society of America Journal (SSSA Journal), published bimonthly, is the official publication of the Soil Science Society of America. The editorial board consists of an editor-in-chief, technical editors, associate editors (including at least one representative for each division of SSSA), a managing editor, the Chief Executive Officer, and the Director of Publications. The SSSA Journal publishes papers on original research, issue papers, reviews, comments and letters to the editor, and book reviews. Papers of appropriate subject matter usually less than two printed pages may be submitted as notes. Invitational papers may be published in the journal if accepted by the editorial board.

Publisher
Soil Science Society of America
Website
https://www.soils.org/publications/sssaj
Impact factor
2.0 (2013)

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Researchers reveal lignin protection mechanism in forest soils

Over the course of forest succession, both components of plant residues and the structure of soil microbial communities play important roles in affecting soil aggregates, and thus the sequestration and stability of soil organic ...

Salmon provide nutrients to Alaskan streambanks

Adult Pacific salmon spend a great portion of their life in the ocean. But their life began along the banks of freshwater streams. Their life will end there, as well. These important steps in the lifecycle of salmon play ...

Microbes play important role in soil's nitrogen cycle

Under our feet, in the soil, is a wealth of microbial activity. Just like humans have different metabolisms and food choices, so do those microbes. In fact, microbes play an important role in making nutrients available to ...

Consider soil in fall-applied ammonia rates, study says

Fall-applied anhydrous ammonia may not fulfill as much of corn's nitrogen needs as previously assumed. According to a new study from the University of Illinois, the effectiveness of the practice depends on the soil.

Helping plant nurseries reduce runoff

You may have heard how excess nutrients, such as phosphorus, can run off of crop fields. This can cause harm when the nutrients end up in rivers and lakes. However, there are other sources of excess nutrients you might not ...

Cover crops, compost and carbon

Soil organic matter has long been known to benefit farmers. The carbon in this organic matter acts as a food source for soil microbes, which then provide other nutrients to the crops grown. Microbes, insects and small soil ...

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