Social Science & Medicine is a peer-reviewed health and social sciences journal. According to its website, it "provides an international and interdisciplinary forum for the dissemination of research findings, reviews and theory in all areas of common interest to social scientists, health practitioners and policy makers. The journal publishes material relevant to any aspect of health from a wide range of social science disciplines (e.g., anthropology, economics, geography, psychology, social epidemiology, social policy, and sociology), and material relevant to the social sciences from any of the professions concerned with physical and mental health, and with health care practice, policy and organization." Social Science & Medicine is rated by Thomson ISI as the world’s most cited social science journal 1997-2007. Social science & medicine ISSN 0037-7856 was published quarterly from 1967-1977 by Pergamon Press out of Elmsford, New York, and was then split, according to the National Library of Medicine as confirmed by the Library of Congress, into: In 1982, Parts A-F were merged back into one journal, at the current (2008) ISSN 0277-9536. It was published by Pergamon Press, which

Publisher
Elsevier
Country
USA
Website
http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/journaldescription.cws_home/315/description#description
Impact factor
2.710 (2009)

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