At work, hierarchies draw narcissist job hunters

People who have narcissistic tendencies are more likely to support hierarchies, according to research by Emily M. Zitek, ILR School assistant professor, and Alexander H. Jordan.

Why Clinton and Trump backers don't mix

Living around people with opposing political viewpoints affects your ability to form close relationships and accept other perspectives - and may even change your personality, finds a national study led by a Michigan State ...

Scientists create a new way to categorize music

A team of scientists from McGill University, the University of Cambridge, and Stanford Graduate School of Business developed a new method of coding and categorizing music. They found that people's preference for these musical ...

A winning face depends on the culture of the voter

In this busy election season, what role does culture play in voter's minds as they view the candidates running for office? In a recent study of elections comparing candidate faces in the U.S. and Taiwan, researchers showed ...

In social hierarchies, moral stigma spreads down more than up

Moral suspicion trickles down social hierarchies, making a top leader's ethical transgressions especially damaging for the careers and reputations of colleagues and subordinates, according to new Stanford research.

E-signatures less trusted than handwritten signatures

Now you don't even have live in Estonia to open a business there. A new program lets people purchase e-signatures that enable them to open bank accounts and run a domestic business without being physically present. But according ...

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