Sex Roles is a peer-reviewed scientific journal published by Springer. The Editor-in-Chief is Irene H. Frieze. Articles appearing in Sex Roles are written from a feminist perspective, and topics span gender role socialization, gendered perceptions and behaviors, gender stereotypes, body image, violence against women, gender issues in employment and work environments, sexual orientation and identity, and methodological issues in gender research. Sex Roles is abstracted/indexed in:

Publisher
Springer Science+Business Media Springer
Website
http://www.springer.com/psychology/gender+studies/journal/11199
Impact factor
0.743 (2008)

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The feminization of men leads to a rise in homophobia

Before the feminist revolution in the late 1960s, men largely built their masculinity on traits that opposed those ascribed to women. Since then, society has been moving increasingly toward gender equality, and men can no ...

Prejudice against women in power is greater than we think

People are more prejudiced against women leaders than the statistics might indicate. This could be because participants in surveys investigating attitudes towards men and women in leadership positions may not answer honestly ...

Hate speech from women is judged harsher than that from men

Women who make hateful remarks on social media are likely to be judged more severely than men who make the same comments. This is also true for reactions to hate speech (counter speech) which when made by women are less accepted ...

Holding on to patriarchy-reinforcing beliefs comes at a price

Some men categorize women into two groups: either they are chaste, nurturing and good, or they are promiscuous, manipulative, and out to seduce them. This polarizing "Madonna-Whore dichotomy" is grounded in a man's desire ...

Princesses and action heroes are for boys and girls

Given the chance, young boys will try out dolls, and girls will play with cars and building blocks. It's even possible to encourage the two sexes to play together without too much moaning, says Lauren Spinner of the University ...

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