Science Signaling is a weekly journal, publishing 51 issues a year, as well as an online resource and information management tool that enables experts and novices in cell signaling to find, organize, and utilize information relevant to processes of cellular regulation. The overarching goal of Science Signaling is publish key findings of broad relevance in the field of cell signaling and to provide articles, community features, tools, and online resources that enable readers to gain insight into cellular regulatory processes. An additional goal of the site is to provide an authoritative database of cell signaling information that is accessible to readers and useful for computer-based analysis.

Publisher
American Association for the Advancement of Science
Country
United States
History
2008–present
Website
http://stke.sciencemag.org/about/

Some content from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA

Surface protein editing in bacteria

University of Minnesota researchers have discovered this previously unknown signaling pathway that regulates surface proteins on bacteria that can lead to new targets for antibiotics.

Infertility's roots in DNA packaging

Pathological infertility is a condition affecting roughly 7 percent of human males, and among those afflicted, 10 to 15 percent are thought to have a genetic cause. However, pinpointing the precise genes responsible for the ...

New possible target for treating major common diseases

There is a large, untapped potential for developing drugs against cancer, fibrosis and cardiovascular diseases by targeting a family of receptors known as Frizzleds, researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden believe. ...

How infectious bacteria hibernate through treatment

Disease-causing bacteria can develop resistance to antibiotics which are then no longer effective in treating infection, yet they also have another tactic to avoid being killed off by antibiotic treatment. Some cells of the ...

Synchrotron science could give soybeans a boost

Scientists at the University of Liverpool, together with Japanese colleagues, have gained new insight into how soil bacteria sense and adapt to the levels of oxygen in their environment. The findings could be used to help ...

page 1 from 4