Psychology of Women Quarterly is a peer-reviewed academic journal that publishes papers in the field of Psychology. The journal s editor is Janice D. Yoder (University of Akron). It has been in publication since 1976 and is currently published by SAGE Publications. Psychology of Women Quarterly publishes empirical research, critical reviews and theoretical articles. The journal aims to advance inquiry in the field of women and gender and to provide a forum for discussion and debate on the subject. Psychology of Women Quarterly also contains brief reports on timely topics, teaching briefs and invited book reviews. Psychology of Women Quarterly is abstracted and indexed in, among other databases: SCOPUS, and the Social Sciences Citation Index. According to the Journal Citation Reports, its 2010 impact factor is 1.420, ranking it 5 out of 35 journals in the category ‘Women’s Studies’.and 40 out of 120 journals in the category ‘Psychology, Multidisciplinary’ The journal describes itself as feminist. It has been criticized for allegedly publishing any dubious research as long as it supports a feminist viewpoint.

Publisher
SAGE Publications
History
1976-present
Website
http://www.uk.sagepub.com/journals/Journal202010?siteId=sage-uk&prodTypes=any&q=Psychology+of+Women+Quarterly&fs=1
Impact factor
1.420 (2010)

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Your gender may affect how you perceive a woman's anxiety in STEM

Undergraduate students' reactions to reading about a woman's anxiety in a science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) class vary by gender according to a Dartmouth-led study published in the Psychology of Women ...

How have gender stereotypes changed in the last 30 years?

A new study finds that gender stereotypes are as strong today as they were 30 years ago, and that people are even more likely now to believe that men avoid "traditional" female roles. This research is out today in Psychology ...

How do men and women respond to gender bias in STEM?

Research has revealed that gender biases limit the opportunities for women within science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) disciplines. But just how prevalent are these biases and how are they perceived differently ...

Should women 'man up' for male-dominated fields?

Women applying for a job in male-dominated fields should consider playing up their masculine qualities, indicates new research by Michigan State University scholars that's part of a series of studies on bias in the hiring ...

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