Proceedings of the Royal Society is the parent title of two scientific journals published by the Royal Society. Originally a single journal, it was split into two separate journals in 1905: Series A, which publishes research related to mathematical, physical, and engineering sciences; Series B, which publishes research related to biology

Publisher
The Royal Society
Country
United Kingdom
History
1905-present
Website
http://rspa.royalsocietypublishing.org/
Impact factor
5.064 (2010)

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Dark-shaded body surface the key to animals avoiding predators

Animals that have a darker pigmented surface on the upper side of their body compared to those that have the same shade all over can reduce the impact of their body shadows and remain hidden from predators, according to a ...

Study finds fish have diverse, distinct gut microbiomes

The rich biodiversity of coral reefs even extends to microbial communities within fish, according to new research. The study in Proceedings of the Royal Society: Biological Sciences reports that several important grazing ...

The secret behind coral reef diversity? Lots of time.

Strap on a diving mask and fins and slip under the crystal-clear water near a coral reef in Indonesia, Papua-New Guinea or the Philippines, and you'll immediately see why divers and snorkelers from across the world flock ...

Barn swallows may indeed have evolved alongside humans

The evolution of barn swallows, a bird ubiquitous to bridges and sheds around the world, might be even more closely tied to humans than previously thought, according to new study from the University of Colorado Boulder.

Tiny polyps save corals from predators and disease

In a new study published today in Proceedings of the Royal Society, scientists show how tiny hydrozoans, polyps smaller than one millimeter and commonly found in dense colonies on the surface of hard corals, may play a role ...

A warbler's flashy yellow throat? There are genes for that

Birds get their bright red, orange and yellow plumage from carotenoid pigments—responsible for many of the same bright colours in plants. But how songbirds turn carotenoids into the spectacular variety of feathered patches ...

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