Proceedings of the Royal Society is the parent title of two scientific journals published by the Royal Society, whereas its initial journal, Philosophical Transactions, is now devoted to special thematic issues. Originally a single journal, "Proceedings" was split into two separate journals in 1905: The two journals are currently the Royal Society s main research journals. Many celebrated names in science have published their research in Proc. R. Soc., including Paul Dirac, Werner Heisenberg, James Clerk Maxwell, Ernest Rutherford, and Erwin Schrödinger. The Proceedings started out in 1800 as the Abstracts of the Papers Printed in the Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. The Royal Society published four volumes, from 1800 to 1843. Volumes 5 and 6, which appeared from 1843 to 1854, were called Abstracts of the Papers Communicated to the Royal Society of London. Starting with volume 7, in 1854, the Proceedings first appeared under the name Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Publication of the proceedings in this form continued to volume 75 in 1905. Starting with volume 76, the Proceedings were split into Proceedings of the Royal Society of London.

Publisher
Royal Society The Royal Society
Country
United Kingdom
History
1905-present
Website
http://rspb.royalsocietypublishing.org/
Impact factor
5.064 (2010)

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Modern apes smarter than pre-humans

New research from the University of Adelaide suggests living great apes are smarter than our pre-human ancestor Australopithecus, a group that included the famous "Lucy."

First skeletal remains of Phoebodus found in Morocco

An international team of researchers has found the first skeletal remains of Phoebodus—an ancient shark—in the Anti-Atlas Mountains in Morocco. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the group ...

Brain parts involved in parenting in frogs revealed

A team of researchers from Stanford University, Harvard University, Centro Jambatu de Investigación y Conservación de Anfibios and East Carolina University has isolated the brain regions involved in poison dart frog parenting. ...

Great apes found to bond when watching videos together

A pair of researchers affiliated with Duke University and the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology has found that great apes tend to bond with one another when they watch a video together. In their paper published ...

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