Proceedings of the Royal Society is the parent title of two scientific journals published by the Royal Society, whereas its initial journal, Philosophical Transactions, is now devoted to special thematic issues. Originally a single journal, "Proceedings" was split into two separate journals in 1905: The two journals are currently the Royal Society s main research journals. Many celebrated names in science have published their research in Proc. R. Soc., including Paul Dirac, Werner Heisenberg, James Clerk Maxwell, Ernest Rutherford, and Erwin Schrödinger. The Proceedings started out in 1800 as the Abstracts of the Papers Printed in the Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. The Royal Society published four volumes, from 1800 to 1843. Volumes 5 and 6, which appeared from 1843 to 1854, were called Abstracts of the Papers Communicated to the Royal Society of London. Starting with volume 7, in 1854, the Proceedings first appeared under the name Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Publication of the proceedings in this form continued to volume 75 in 1905. Starting with volume 76, the Proceedings were split into Proceedings of the Royal Society of London.

Publisher
Royal Society The Royal Society
Country
United Kingdom
History
1905-present
Website
http://rspb.royalsocietypublishing.org/
Impact factor
5.064 (2010)

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It's official: Science says grannies are good for you

Scientists say they have proven what many people fortunate enough to grow up with theirs have known all along: Grandmothers have strong nurturing instincts and are hard-wired to care deeply about their grandchildren.

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Apex predator of the Cambrian likely sought soft over crunchy prey

Biomechanical studies on the arachnid-like front "legs" of an extinct apex predator show that the 2-foot (60 centimeter) marine animal Anomalocaris canadensis was likely much weaker than once assumed. One of the largest animals ...

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