PLoS Computational Biology is a peer-reviewed computational biology journal established in 2005 and published by the nonprofit Public Library of Science in association with the International Society for Computational Biology. Its Editor in Chief is Philip Bourne. All articles are open access and licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution License. The journal is well-known beyond its core field for its Ten Simple Rules series of articles that capture the essence of selected aspects of research in computational biology or in science more generally, e.g. how to present a poster, how to collaborate, or how to edit Wikipedia. Due to their free licensing, files from PLoS Computational Biology can be reused in places other than the journal s website, e.g. to illustrate Wikipedia articles.

Publisher
Public Library of Science
Country
United States
History
2005–present
Website
http://www.ploscompbiol.org/
Impact factor
5.759 (2009)

Some content from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA

New approach to epidemic modeling could speed up pandemic simulations

Simulations that help determine how a large-scale pandemic will spread can take weeks or even months to run. A recent study in PLOS Computational Biology offers a new approach to epidemic modeling that could drastically speed ...

Harnessing smartphones to track how people use green spaces

A new study demonstrates how anonymized GPS data from people's smartphones can be used to monitor the public's use of parks and other green spaces in urban areas, which could help inform their management. Alessandro Filazzola ...

Study shows how moral behavior pays off in the end

Selfless behavior and cooperation cannot be taken for granted. Mohammad Salahshour of the Max Planck Institute for Mathematics in the Sciences (now at Max Planck Institute of Animal Behavior), has used a game theory-based ...

Clarifying the chaos of narwhal behavior

Researchers have used the mathematical equations of chaos theory to analyze the data from long-term monitoring of an electronically tagged narwhal. They have extracted previously undetected diurnal patterns within what initially ...

Honeybees are less likely to sting in larger groups

To sting or not to sting? An alarm pheromone plays a decisive role in bees' willingness to sting—and their group size, as scientists from the University of Konstanz have now shown

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