PLoS Computational Biology is a peer-reviewed computational biology journal established in 2005 and published by the nonprofit Public Library of Science in association with the International Society for Computational Biology. Its Editor in Chief is Philip Bourne. All articles are open access and licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution License. The journal is well-known beyond its core field for its Ten Simple Rules series of articles that capture the essence of selected aspects of research in computational biology or in science more generally, e.g. how to present a poster, how to collaborate, or how to edit Wikipedia. Due to their free licensing, files from PLoS Computational Biology can be reused in places other than the journal s website, e.g. to illustrate Wikipedia articles.

Publisher
Public Library of Science
Country
United States
History
2005–present
Website
http://www.ploscompbiol.org/
Impact factor
5.759 (2009)

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New tool mines scientific texts for fusion protein facts

A new computational tool called ProtFus screens scientific literature to validate predictions about the activity of fusion proteins—proteins encoded by the joining of two genes that previously encoded two separate proteins. ...

Mathematical model explores daily rhythms in pain sensitivity

A new computational model successfully predicts how daily pain sensitivity rhythms affect pain processing, both in healthy adults and in people with neuropathic pain. Jennifer Crodelle of New York University and colleagues ...

New AI tool captures top players' strategies in RNA video game

A new artificial-intelligence tool captures strategies used by top players of an internet-based videogame to design new RNA molecules. Rohan Koodli and colleagues at the Eterna massive open laboratory present the tool, called ...

People's motivations bias how they gather information

A new study suggests people stop gathering evidence earlier when the data supports their desired conclusion than when it supports the conclusion they wish was false. Filip Gesiarz, Donal Cahill and Tali Sharot of University ...

Computational tool predicts how gut microbiome changes over time

A new computational modeling method uses snapshots of which types of microbes are found in a person's gut to predict how the microbial community will change over time. The tool, developed by Liat Shenhav, Leah Briscoe and ...

Learning constrains further learning, neuroscientists find

Why is it that a master musician can learn a new score in no time, yet encounter difficulty learning something else, like skateboarding tricks? Could there be any truth to the myth that you use only 10 percent of your brain? ...

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