PLoS Biology is a peer-reviewed scientific journal covering all aspects of biology. Publication began on October 13, 2003. It was the first journal of the Public Library of Science. All content in PLoS Biology is published under the Creative Commons "by-attribution" license. To fund the journal, the publication s business model requires that, in most cases, authors will pay publication costs. In addition to research articles, PLoS Biology publishes online e-letters in which readers provide comments on articles. According to the Journal Citation Reports, the journal has a 2009 impact factor of 12.916, ranking it first in the category Biology . Mike Taylor of Discover Magazine said in 2012 that while PLoS Biology has a high impact factor, "PLoS has de-emphasized this traditional, problematic measure, so you won’t find this fact blazoned across their website." The current editor-in-chief is Jonathan Eisen (University of California, Davis). Due to their free licensing, files from PLoS Biology can be reused in places other than the original article, e.g. to illustrate Wikipedia articles.

Publisher
Public Library of Science
History
2003–present
Website
http://www.plosbiology.org/
Impact factor
12.916 (2009)

Some content from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA

Who's Tweeting about scientific research? And why?

Although Twitter is best known for its role in political and cultural discourse, it has also become an increasingly vital tool for scientific communication. The record of social media engagement by laypeople is decoded by ...

Strigolactones increase tolerance to weevils in tobacco plants

A team of researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology in Jena, Germany, has discovered that strigolactones, a class of novel plant hormones, mediate the fine-tuning of the production plant defensive substances ...

Primate voice boxes are evolving at rapid pace

Scientists have discovered that the larynx, or voice box, of primates is significantly larger relative to body size, has greater variation, and is under faster rates of evolution than in other mammals.

Stay or leave? A tale of two virus strategies revealed by math

As small and relatively simple as they may be, even viruses have strategies. Now, researchers in Japan report that they can evaluate two of these strategies through a combination of biology and math, providing a new tool ...

High time to open up ecological research

Share the code and data behind the research please. It's easy, but it will have a major positive impact on progress and trust in science. That is the clear message from a new paper in PLOS Biology. An international team of ...

page 1 from 32