Physics Today

Physics Today, created in 1948, is the membership journal of the American Institute of Physics. It is provided to 130,000 members of twelve physics societies, including the American Physical Society. Over the last 60 years many famous physicists have written for the magazine, including Albert Einstein, Niels Bohr, and Richard Feynman. Although its content is scientifically rigorous and up to date, it is not a true scholarly journal in the sense of being a primary vehicle for communicating new results. Rather, it is more of a hybrid magazine that informs readers about important developments in the form of overview articles written by experts, shorter review articles written internally by staff, and also discusses the latest issues and events of importance to the science community such as science politics. The physics community s main vessel for new results is the Physical Review suite of scientific journals published by the American Physical Society and Applied Physics Letters published by the American Institute of Physics. The magazine provides a historical resource of events associated to physics, including debunking the physics behind the so-called Star Wars program of the 1980s,

Publisher
American Institute of Physics
Country
United States
History
1948–Present
Impact factor
4.432 (2010)
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How "The Big Bang Theory" portrays scientists

Love it or hate it, you've probably at least heard of CBS's hit TV show The Big Bang Theory, now in its 10th year of production. But how accurately does it portray scientific culture, and does it break or reinforce stereotypes? ...

dateJan 06, 2017 in General Physics
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Tiny tool measures heat at the nanoscale

How heat flows at the nanoscale can be very different than at larger scales. Understanding how surfaces affect the transport of the fundamental units of heat, called phonons, could impact everything from thermoelectric materials ...

dateFeb 27, 2014 in General Physics
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Blackening copper opens new applications

(Phys.org)—Copper is one of the world's most widely used metals. Now researchers at the University of Dundee have found that blackening copper using industry-standard lasers could make it even more adaptable and efficient.

dateJan 16, 2013 in Condensed Matter
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