Physical Review E: Statistical, Nonlinear, and Soft Matter Physics is a peer-reviewed, scientific journal, published monthly by the American Physical Society. The main field of interest is many-body phenomena. The Editor-in-Chief is Gene D. Sprouse. While original research content requires subscription, editorials, news, and other non-research content is openly accessible. Although the focus of this journal is many-body phenomena, the broad scope of the journal includes quantum chaos, soft matter physics, classical chaos, biological physics and granular materials. Also emphasized are statistical physics, equilibrium and transport properties of fluids, liquid crystals, complex fluids, polymers, chaos, fluid dynamics, plasma physics, classical physics, and computational physics. This journal began as "Physical Review" in 1893. In 1913 the American Physical Society took over "Physical Review". In 1970 "Physical Review" was subdivided into Physical Review A, B, C, and D. From 1990 until 1993 a process was underway which split the journal then entitled " Physical Review A: General Physics" into two journals. Hence, from 1993 until 2000, one of the split off journals became Physical

Publisher
American Physical Society
Country
United States
History
1993 to present
Website
http://pre.aps.org/
Impact factor
2.352 (2010)

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