Oryx-The International Journal of Conservation is a quarterly peer-reviewed journal of biodiversity conservation, conservation policy and sustainable use, and the interaction of these subjects with social, economic and political issues. The journal has a particular interest in material that has the potential to improve conservation management and practice, supports the publishing and communication aspirations of conservation researchers and practitioners worldwide and helps build capacity for conservation. Besides articles and short communications, Oryx regularly publishes reviews, forum sections and letters, and every issue includes comprehensive reporting of international conservation news.

Publisher
Cambridge University Press
Website
http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=ORX
Impact factor
1.826 (2011)

Some content from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA

Study looks at ranger motivation in dangerous African park

A new study by WCS looks at the job satisfaction of front line conservation rangers working in challenging conditions at a national park in the eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) and identifies ways to improve ...

African fires wipe out endangered rhino's favorite foods

Fires in the African savannah – planned by national park staff to regenerate the preferred grasses of grazers such as wildebeests and zebras – are killing the few foods that endangered black rhinos love to eat.

Recreational fisheries pose threat to skittish sea turtles

Every summer, thousands of amateur scallopers flock to the warm coastal waters of Florida's Crystal River region, anchor their boats and reap the delicious bounty of the state's largest recreational bay scallop fishery.

A botanical mystery solved by phylogenetic testing

Missouri Botanical Garden researchers used DNA testing to rediscover Dracaena umbraculifera, which was thought to be extinct. The methods and results were published in Oryx. The authors include Garden researchers in both ...

Jaguar conservation depends on neighbors' attitudes

According to a new survey of residents living near two major national parks in Panama, jaguars deserve increased protection. Nature and wildlife are considered national treasures. But because most residents still support ...

page 1 from 5