Nature Structural & Molecular Biology is an academic journal publishing research articles, reviews, news and commentaries in structural biology and molecular biology, with an emphasis on papers that further a "functional and mechanistic understanding of how molecular components in a biological process work together". One of the group of Nature journals, it is published by the Nature Publishing Group, a division of Macmillan Publishers Ltd. Founded in 1994 under the title Nature Structural Biology (ISSN: 1072-8368), the journal was renamed to the present title in January 2004. Like other Nature journals, there is no external Editorial Board, with editorial decisions being made by an in-house team, although peer review by external expert referees forms a part of the review process. Nature Structural & Molecular Biology is published monthly. Articles are archived online in text and PDF formats; access is by subscription only. Its 2009 impact factor was 12.273.

Publisher
Macmillan Publishers Macmillan
Country
United States
History
Nature Structural Biology (1994–2003); Nature Structural & Molecular Biology (2004–present)
Website
http://www.nature.com/nsmb/index.html
Impact factor
12.273 (2009)

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A solid scaffolding for cells

To perform the task for which they have been synthesized, proteins must first assemble to form effective cellular "machines." But how do they recognize their partners at the right time? Researchers at the University of Geneva ...

A molecular hammock for cotranslational modification

Proteins do most of the real work in cells and are modified in accordance with functional requirements. An LMU team has now shown how proteins are chemically altered on the ribosome, even before they fold into the active ...

From receptor structure to new osteoporosis drugs

Researchers at the University of Zurich have determined the three-dimensional structure of a receptor that controls the release of calcium from bones. The receptor is now one of the main candidates for developing new drugs ...

Biologists discover source for boosting tumor cell drug sensitivity

DNA-damaging agents, or "DDAs," make up the most widely used group of cancer drugs. Yet their therapeutic success has been curtailed by drug resistance—either present in cancer cells from the disease onset or arising during ...

RNA-protein network may explain why melanoma grows more

With five-year survival rates being around 30 percent for patients with distant metastatic disease, cutaneous melanoma is the leading cause of skin cancer-related deaths. The major causes of the low survival rate for melanoma ...

Damaged liver cells undergo reprogramming to regenerate

In Greek mythology, Zeus punishes the trickster Prometheus by chaining him to a rock and sending an eagle to eat a portion of his liver every day, in perpetuity. It was the right organ to target – the liver has the ability ...

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