Nature Structural & Molecular Biology is an academic journal publishing research articles, reviews, news and commentaries in structural biology and molecular biology, with an emphasis on papers that further a "functional and mechanistic understanding of how molecular components in a biological process work together". One of the group of Nature journals, it is published by the Nature Publishing Group, a division of Macmillan Publishers Ltd. Founded in 1994 under the title Nature Structural Biology (ISSN: 1072-8368), the journal was renamed to the present title in January 2004. Like other Nature journals, there is no external Editorial Board, with editorial decisions being made by an in-house team, although peer review by external expert referees forms a part of the review process. Nature Structural & Molecular Biology is published monthly. Articles are archived online in text and PDF formats; access is by subscription only. Its 2009 impact factor was 12.273.

Publisher
Macmillan Publishers Macmillan
Country
United States
History
Nature Structural Biology (1994–2003); Nature Structural & Molecular Biology (2004–present)
Website
http://www.nature.com/nsmb/index.html
Impact factor
12.273 (2009)

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Key insights into a protein linked to diabetes and hypertension

The amount of salt and water in our cells and their pH is strictly controlled for cell survival. To maintain the necessary balance, special proteins perform the essential role of exchanging protons (hydrogen ions, or H+) ...

Linker histone's surprising partnership with single-stranded DNA

To keep order in the tight quarters of the cell nucleus, our DNA is neatly clamped in place around a central disk by H1 linker histone, which helps shepherd DNA into the tidy chromatin fibers that comprise chromosomes. Linker ...

New study characterizes behavior of human plastins in cells

A family of proteins that have a role in ensuring many types of cells move and maintain their shape may promote disease when they act like workaholics and disrupt the cellular environment, new research suggests.

Cryo-EM reveals how '911' molecule helps fix damaged DNA

When something goes wrong during DNA replication, cells call their own version of 911 to pause the process and fix the problem—a failsafe that is critical to maintaining health and staving off disease.

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